A snippet from Jem of Skye

Posted: January 30, 2018 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Here’s a little snippet from Jem of Skye for you good folks:

That night, Jem lay awake and listened to Kaetu breathe. No more than a foot of space separated them, but it may as well have been the distance between Janus and Cirrus, for all the good it did him. He could smell her wonderful hair, but he couldn’t touch her. So, with a small sigh he turned away from her in the darkness and let his mind wander.

Unbidden, images came to him. They were all images of writing, some from the old tab-books that his mother kept. There would be a pictures of her and father when they were young, and behind them would be a sign. He had never before associated the signs with any meaning, but there, on the edge of sleep, he could suddenly read them.

Jem read the words and sounded them aloud in mere whispers, and instantly their meaning came to him: “No admittance.” “Café Crepe.” “Telescope Open to Public.” “No Public Restroom.”

Jem sat up in bed.

He could read!

He dashed out of his bed, thumbed on his slippers and ran across the room, dodging beds from their location in his memory.

He ran through the chow hall and into the front hall, sprinted down the long first floor hallway and to the stairs. From there he ran the width of the second floor and to the other stairs and onto the third. After that it was down the half-mile long hallway to the rear of the complex and up the stairs to the library.

The door was open, so he flashed inside. He ran to the closest rack, grabbed a book from the shelf and riffled it open. He began reading.

The exact time and place of Plato’s birth are unknown, but it is certain that he belonged to an aristocratic and influential family.

He understood it! Jem flipped further.

The role of Apollo as god of plague is evident in the invocation of Apollo Smintheus (“mouse Apollo”) by Chryses, the Trojan priest of Apollo, with the purpose of sending a plague against the Greeks (the reasoning behind a god of the plague becoming a god of healing is of course apotropaic, meaning that the god responsible for bringing the plague must be appeased in order to remove the plague).

“Master Jem!” Goat’s voice shouted. “The library is closed. It is after hours.”

“I have to read something, Goat! I have to read right now!”

“It is not allowed.” The mec floated beside him, deftly removed the book from Jem’s hand and replaced it on the shelf without even glancing to see whether or not it was put back in the correct place. From this Jem inferred that Goat knew the location of every book in the library.

“I have to!” Jem cried.

“Aha! So, you admit it now.”

Jem’s shoulders sagged. “Yes. You were right all along. I must read.”

“Then there is only one thing to do. I have a book you can take back with you. It is the Book of Subjects. It is an index of the entire library.” The mec turned and floated across to the table next to the open doorway.

“I can take it?” Jem asked.

“Certainly. We have over a thousand copies of the Index in a closet. This one is yours.” Goat removed a large book and held out his arm to Jem.

Jem ran to Goat and took the book.

“Thanks, Goat! I’ll bring it back. I promise.”

“No need, Master Jem. No need at all. But I daresay that you will have difficulty reading it after lights out.”

“Oh, I’m not going to read it tonight,” Jem said. “I’m going to sleep with it.”

“Hmph.” Goat stated, and Jem was gone back out the door, disappearing into the darkness as if he’d never come. “Kids.”

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